A Tribute to Despair – A Journey Toward Light

Written by Rebecca Kinzie Bastian The path to healing is never easy. It can take years of focused, purposeful work to recover from the traumas that life so often and easily hands out. Meditating, finding purpose, embracing the positive energy that surrounds us—all of these techniques are powerful tools for those on the healing path. In his new  exhibit, “Reign Upon Sonrise: A Five Year ...
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Self as Muse: An Interview with Savannah Spirit

Written by Daniel Maidman In her first New York City solo show, “Nevertheless, She Persisted,” photographer Savannah Spirit finds inspiration turning the lens on herself.  Artist Savannah Spirit was born in LA in the mid 70’s and has been happily shooting photographs since she was 7 years old. Spirit’s work addresses body positivity, the female/male gaze, and women’s rights. As an activist, Savannah has dedicated ...
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A New Book On Australian Contemporary Art Foregrounds Questions About Diversity

Written by Naima Morelli Polemics about the lack of diversity in the image of Australian art ensued after the publication of a new book entitled Australiana to Zeitgeist: An A-Z of Australian Contemporary Art (2017). But is Australian contemporary art as white as it seems? And how is it perceived abroad? Tony Albert, A Collected History, 2002-2010, courtesy of the artist Art mirrors the society and times that produce ...
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Beyond Collecting: A Conversation with Craig O’Neil

Written by Lori Zimmer Art collecting in today’s hyped-up art market is a complicated beast. Many want to simply support artists, but some collectors want to make a quick buck by flipping the hottest artists tomorrow at auction, while others are looking for long-term investment in the art they think will appreciate in value. Then there are some collectors whose process goes beyond collecting and takes ...
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State of the Art in American Figurative Painting: A Fractional Survey of an Impossibly Broad Topic

Written by Daniel Maidman I am an American figurative painter, and I write about art, so D/RAILED asked me to write about where American figurative painting stands today. This was exciting at first, but the more I chased it, the farther the topic receded. The field is enormous and shows almost no conceptual or procedural unity. One’s only hope, in approaching the topic overall, is ...
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Alternating States at the 57th Venice Biennale

Written by Dorian Batycka The Venice Biennale is one of the oldest and longest-running exhibitions of contemporary art in the world, dating back to 1895 when the first International Art Exhibition was organized shortly after the unification of Italy. Over the last 120 years, the Venice Biennale has proven itself time and again as one of the most crucial and important cultural institutions in the ...
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In Memoriam – Dianne Bowen: Remembering a New York City Artist

Written by Kofi Forson In the introduction to Charles Green’s The Third Hand, Collaboration in Art From Conceptualism To Postmodernism, entitled Collaboration as Symptom, he speaks of artists in their art, “voluntarily placing themselves center stage in self-portraits but also at the margins of all their other works, constructing themselves through brush marks, in signature style, by individual preferences, and through repeated motifs – in short, ...
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Anxiety, Dizziness and the Ambivalence of Freedom: Some Reflections on the 2017 Whitney Biennial

Written by Valentina Gioia Levy The longest-running survey of American Art came back with a show that brings together more or less established artists from different generations in a show that doesn’t fail to spark debates and produce some disappointments. Featured for the first time in the Whitney’s stunning new building in the Meatpacking District, the current edition of the Whitney Biennial mirrors the unnerving image of today’s America. ...
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Awaiting Political Specters: Documenta 14

Written by Dorian Batycka and Vanessa Gravenor Documenta is a quinquennial exhibition of contemporary art that since 1955 has created a space for healing war torn regions through art. Begun in the German city of Kassel, in the wake of World War II, Documenta has in its roots an underlying sense that unification is possible through art and culture, a shamanistic potential that auspiciously hangs ...
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Through the Looking Glass: Innovative Women Artists Who Reclaimed the Gaze At New York Armory Art Week

Written by Audra Lambert Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas — only I don’t exactly know what they are!” Carroll, Lewis. Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) In Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, the titular character from Alice in Wonderland once again returns to a magical, disorienting universe. Echoing her earlier adventures, this new ...
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A Tribute to Despair – A Journey Toward Light


Self as Muse: An Interview with Savannah Spirit


A New Book On Australian Contemporary Art Foregrounds Questions About Diversity


Beyond Collecting: A Conversation with Craig O’Neil


State of the Art in American Figurative Painting: A Fractional Survey of an Impossibly Broad Topic


Alternating States at the 57th Venice Biennale


In Memoriam – Dianne Bowen: Remembering a New York City Artist


Anxiety, Dizziness and the Ambivalence of Freedom: Some Reflections on the 2017 Whitney Biennial


Awaiting Political Specters: Documenta 14


Through the Looking Glass: Innovative Women Artists Who Reclaimed the Gaze At New York Armory Art Week


The Imaginary Prisons. An Exercise of Freedom from Giovanni Battista Piranesi to Vik Muniz


Withdraw from Reality into the Thresholds of Danger: Dreamlands at the Whitney


Regional Is the Way: Art Stage Singapore 2017


Bodies for a Future yet to Come


Enter the World of Omer Fast’s Post-Terror Hysteria